Associations of prenatal one-carbon metabolism nutrients and metals with epigenetic aging biomarkers at birth and in childhood in a US cohort

Anne K. Bozack, Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman, Andrea A. Baccarelli, Robert O. Wright, Diane R. Gold, Emily Oken, Marie France Hivert, Andres Cardenas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Epigenetic gestational age acceleration (EGAA) at birth and epigenetic age acceleration (EAA) in childhood may be biomarkers of the intrauterine environment. We investigated the extent to which first-trimester folate, B12, 5 essential, and 7 non-essential metals in maternal circulation are associated with EGAA and EAA in early life. Bohlin EGAA and Horvath pan-tissue and skin and blood EAA were calculated using DNA methylation measured in cord blood (N=351) and mid-childhood blood (N=326; median age = 7.7 years) in the Project Viva pre-birth cohort. A one standard deviation increase in individual essential metals (copper, manganese, and zinc) was associated with 0.94-1.2 weeks lower Horvath EAA at birth, and patterns of exposures identified by exploratory factor analysis suggested that a common source of essential metals was associated with Horvath EAA. We also observed evidence nonlinear associations of zinc with Bohlin EGAA, magnesium and lead with Horvath EAA, and cesium with skin and blood EAA at birth. Overall, associations at birth did not persist in mid-childhood; however, arsenic was associated with greater EAA at birth and in childhood. Prenatal metals, including essential metals and arsenic, are associated with epigenetic aging in early life, which might be associated with future health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3107-3136
Number of pages30
JournalAging
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2024

Keywords

  • B12
  • epigenetic age acceleration
  • folate
  • metals
  • prenatal exposures

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