Associations of dietary intake and longitudinal measures of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in predominantly Hispanic young Adults: A multicohort study

Hailey E. Hampson, Elizabeth Costello, Douglas I. Walker, Hongxu Wang, Brittney O. Baumert, Damaskini Valvi, Sarah Rock, Dean P. Jones, Michael I. Goran, Frank D. Gilliland, David V. Conti, Tanya L. Alderete, Zhanghua Chen, Leda Chatzi, Jesse A. Goodrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are pollutants linked to adverse health effects. Diet is an important source of PFAS exposure, yet it is unknown how diet impacts longitudinal PFAS levels. Objective: To determine if dietary intake and food sources were associated with changes in blood PFAS concentrations among Hispanic young adults at risk of metabolic diseases. Methods: Predominantly Hispanic young adults from the Children's Health Study who underwent two visits (CHS; n = 123) and young adults from NHANES 2013–2018 who underwent one visit (n = 604) were included. Dietary data at baseline was collected using two 24-hour dietary recalls to measure individual foods and where foods were prepared/consumed (home/restaurant/fast-food). PFAS were measured in blood at both visits in CHS and cross-sectionally in NHANES. In CHS, multiple linear regression assessed associations of baseline diet with longitudinal PFAS; in NHANES, linear regression was used. Results: In CHS, all PFAS except PFDA decreased across visits (all p < 0.05). In CHS, A 1-serving higher tea intake was associated with 24.8 %, 16.17 %, and 12.6 % higher PFHxS, PFHpS, and PFNA at follow-up, respectively (all p < 0.05). A 1-serving higher pork intake was associated with 13.4 % higher PFOA at follow-up (p < 0.05). Associations were similar in NHANES, including unsweetened tea, hot dogs, and processed meats. For food sources, in CHS each 200-gram increase in home-prepared food was associated with 0.90 % and 1.6 % lower PFOS at baseline and follow-up, respectively, and in NHANES was associated with 0.9 % lower PFDA (all p < 0.05). Conclusion: Results suggest that beverage consumption habits and food preparation are associated with differences in PFAS levels in young adults. This highlights the importance of diet in determining PFAS exposure and the necessity of public monitoring of foods and beverages for PFAS contamination.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108454
JournalEnvironment international
Volume185
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Food packaging
  • Food sources
  • Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances

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