Association between reproductive factors with lung cancer incidence and mortality: A pooled analysis of over 308,000 females in the Asia cohort consortium

Xin Yin, Rie Kishida, Sarah Krull Abe, Md Rashedul Islam, Md Shafiur Rahman, Eiko Saito, Qing Lan, Batel Blechter, Melissa Merritt, Ji Yeob Choi, Aesun Shin, Ryoko Katagiri, Xiao Ou Shu, Norie Sawada, Akiko Tamakoshi, Woon Puay Koh, Ichiro Tsuji, Chisato Nagata, Sue K. Park, Sun Seog KweonYu Tang Gao, Shoichiro Tsugane, Takashi Kimura, Jian Min Yuan, Yukai Lu, Seiki Kanemura, Yumi Sugawara, Keiko Wada, Min Ho Shin, Habibul Ahsan, Paolo Boffetta, Kee Seng Chia, Keitaro Matsuo, You Lin Qiao, Nathaniel Rothman, Wei Zheng, Manami Inoue, Daehee Kang, Wei Jie Seow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous studies have investigated the association between reproductive factors and lung cancer risk; however, findings have been inconsistent. In order to assess this association among Asian women, a total of 308,949 female participants from 11 prospective cohorts and four Asian countries (Japan, Korea, China, and Singapore) were included. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 3,119 primary lung cancer cases and 2247 lung cancer deaths were identified with a mean follow-up of 16.4 years. Parous women had a lower risk of lung cancer incidence and mortality as compared with nulliparous women, with HRs of 0.82 (95% CI = 0.70–0.96) and 0.78 (95% CI = 0.65–0.94). The protective association of parity and lung cancer incidence was greater among ever-smokers (HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49–0.87) than in never-smokers (HR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.74–1.09) (P-interaction = 0.029). Compared with age at first delivery ≤20 years, older age at first delivery (21–25, ≥26 years) was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer incidence and mortality. Women who ever used hormone replacements had a higher likelihood of developing non-small cell lung cancer (HR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.02–1.68), compared to those who never used hormone replacements. Future studies are needed to assess the underlying mechanisms, the relationships within these female reproductive factors, and the potential changes in smoking habits over time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2090-2105
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume154
Issue number12
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Asian
  • female
  • hormone
  • lung cancer
  • reproductive factors

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