Assessment of Risk Factors and Rate of Conversion to Total Hip Arthroplasty Within 2 Years After Hip Arthroscopy Utilizing a Large Database of Commercially Insured Patients in the United States

Justin Tiao, William Ranson, Renee Ren, Kevin C. Wang, Ashley M. Rosenberg, Michael Herrera, Nicole Zubizarreta, Shawn G. Anthony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The conversion rate of hip arthroscopy (HA) to total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been reported to be as high as 10%. Despite identifying factors that increase the risk of conversion, current studies do not stratify patients by type of arthroscopic procedure. Purpose/Hypothesis: To analyze the rate and predictors of conversion to THA within 2 years after HA. It was hypothesized that osteoarthritis (OA) and increased patient age would negatively affect the survivorship of HA. Study Design: Cohort study; Evidence level, 3. Methods: The IBM MarketScan database was utilized to identify patients who underwent HA and converted to THA within 2 years at inpatient and outpatient facilities between 2013 and 2017. Patients were split into 3 procedure cohorts as follows: (1) femoroacetabular osteoplasty (FAO), which included treatment for femoroacetabular impingement; (2) isolated debridement; and (3) isolated labral repair. Cohort characteristics were compared using standardized differences. Conversion rates between the 3 cohorts were compared using chi-square tests. The relationship between age and conversion was assessed using linear regression. Predictors of conversion were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. The median time to conversion was estimated using Kaplan-Meier tests. Results: A total of 5048 patients were identified, and the rates of conversion to THA were 12.86% for isolated debridement, 8.67% for isolated labral repair, and 6.76% for FAO (standardized difference, 0.138). The isolated labral repair cohort had the shortest median time to conversion (isolated labral repair, 10.88 months; isolated debridement, 10.98 months; and FAO, 11.9 months [P =.034). For patients >50 years, isolated debridement had the highest rate of conversion at 18.8%. The conversion rate increased linearly with age. Factors that increased the odds of conversion to THA were OA, having an isolated debridement procedure, and older patient age (P <.05). Conclusion: Older patients and those with preexisting OA of the hip were at a significantly increased risk of failing HA and requiring a total hip replacement within 2 years of the index procedure. Younger patients were at low risk of requiring a conversion procedure no matter which arthroscopic procedure was performed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOrthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2024

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • femoroacetabular impingement
  • hip
  • hip arthroscopy
  • hip replacement
  • statistics

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