Artificial in vivo biofiltration: Slow continuous intravenous plasmafiltration (SCIP) and artificial organ support

Harold H. Handley, F. Ronco, R. Gorsuch, H. Peters, T. G. Cooper, N. W. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

An intravenous plasmafiltration (SCIP) catheter has been developed and is proposed for clinical investigation into the alleviation of acute fluid overload by SCUF of the extracted plasma. The system utilizes a unique backflushing technique, high intravenous shear flow rates and biocompatible polymers to minimize protein and platelet aggregation along the filter surfaces. The absence of platelets from the extracted plasma promotes the longevity of ultrafiltration cartridges, thus theoretically minimizing attendant labor associated with continuous renal replacement therapies. Clinical studies are currently being planned for the near future. Plasma SCUF is envisioned as a predecessor technology to future applications in therapeutic apheresis, tissue engineering, therapeutic sorbent technologies. Further, with improved longevity profiles, intravenous SCUF or dialysis and implantable or wearable artificial organs based upon artificial in vivo biofiltration are possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-194
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Artificial Organs
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Plasmapheresis catheter
  • Review
  • SCIP
  • SCUF
  • Slow continuous plasmapheresis
  • Therapeutic apheresis

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