Articular chondrocytes from animals with a dermatan sulfate storage disease undergo a high rate of apoptosis and release nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines: A possible mechanism underlying degenerative joint disease in the mucopolysaccharidoses

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Abstract

Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) Type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy Disease) is the lysosomal storage disease characterized by deficient arylsulfatase B activity and the resultant accumulation of dermatan sulfate-containing glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). A major feature of this and other MPS disorders is abnormal cartilage and bone development leading to short stature, dysostosis multiplex, and degenerative joint disease. To investigate the underlying cause(s) of degenerative joint disease in the MPS disorders, articular cartilage and cultured articular chondrocytes were examined from rats and cats with MPS VI. An age-progressive increase in the number of apoptotic chondrocytes was identified in the MPS animals by terminal transferase nick-end translation (TUNEL) staining and by immunohistochemical staining with anti-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) antibodies. Articular chondrocytes grown from these animals also released more nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) into the culture media than did control chondrocytes. Notably, dermatan sulfate, the GAG that accumulates in MPS VI cells, induced NO release from normal chondrocytes, suggesting that GAG accumulation was responsible, in part, for the enhanced cell death in the MPS cells. Coculture of normal chondrocytes with MPS VI cells reduced the amount of NO release, presumably because of the release of arylsulfatase B by the normal cells and reuptake by the mutant cells. As a result of the enhanced chondrocyte death, marked proteoglycan and collagen depletion was observed in the MPS articular cartilage matrix. These results demonstrate that MPS VI articular chondrocytes undergo cell death at a higher rate than normal cells, because of either increased levels of dermatan sulfate and/or the presence of inflammatory cytokines in the MPS joints. In turn, this leads to abnormal cartilage matrix homeostasis in the MPS individuals, which further exacerbates the joint deformities characteristic of these disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1319-1328
Number of pages10
JournalLaboratory Investigation
Volume81
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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