Appetite and gut hormones response to a putative α-glucosidase inhibitor, Salacia Chinensis, in overweight/obese adults: A double blind randomized controlled trial

Lihong Hao, Yvette Schlussel, Krista Fieselmann, Stephen H. Schneider, Sue A. Shapses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Animal studies indicate Salacia reduces body weight, possibly due to its α-glucosidase inhibitor (α-GI) properties, but this has not been examined previously. In this study, a randomized, placebo-controlled, three-way cross-over design was used to evaluate whether Salacia Chinensis (SC) reduces appetite in healthy overweight/obese individuals (body mass index 28.8 ±3.6 kg/m2; 32 ± 12 years). Forty-eight participants were fasted overnight and consumed a dose of SC (300 or 500 mg) or placebo with a fixed breakfast meal at each visit. Appetite sensations, glycemic indices and gastrointestinal peptides were measured. Results indicated that SC had no effect on postprandial appetite. However, in women, hunger was reduced by SC compared to placebo at multiple time points (300 mg; p < 0.05), but not in men. Area under the curve (AUC) for serum glucose, insulin and amylin was attenuated with SC compared to placebo (p < 0.05). Glucagon like peptide-1 had two peaks after the meal, but the AUC did not differ between groups. The AUC of peak areas for peptide YY and ghrelin were greater for SC than placebo (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that Salacia decreases glycemic indices supporting its role as an α-GI, and affects certain gastrointestinal peptides suggesting it may be an appetite modulator.

Original languageEnglish
Article number869
JournalNutrients
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Aug 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Appetite
  • Gastrointestinal peptides
  • Glycemic indices
  • Salacia Chinensis

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