Amplified Cardiopulmonary Recordings: Music Therapy Legacy Intervention with Adult Oncology Patients and Their Families - A Preliminary Program Evaluation

Brian Schreck, Joanne Loewy, Renato V. Larocca, Elizabeth Harman, Elizabeth Archer-Nanda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Amplified cardiopulmonary recording (ACPR) is a unique music therapy intervention implementing recorded heartbeats with meaningful music. Although its clinical application has grown, there is limited research on the acceptability and usage by bereaved families. Objective: The research objective was to understand the frequency recipients engaged with ACPR after their loved one died. Design: A survey was undertaken with relatives of 191 adult patients who had participated in ACPR. Setting/Subjects: Bereaved loved ones of adult oncology patients who received care at the Norton Cancer Institute in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Results: Out of the 191 participants, 73% of family members responded, 49% reported listening to their recording frequently, 31% listened to the recording at least once after receiving it, and 20% reported never listening. Conclusions: ACPR appears to have moderate acceptability and usage among bereaved family members, especially when created in the context of ongoing music therapy treatment. We recommend that this process-based music therapy intervention be studied further and offered proactively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1409-1412
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Palliative Medicine
Volume25
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2022

Keywords

  • amplified cardiopulmonary recordings
  • bereavement
  • cancer
  • caregivers
  • heartbeat recording
  • legacy
  • music therapy
  • preloss

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