Allocation of food allergy responsibilities and its correlates for children and adolescents

Rachel A. Annunziato, Melissa Rubes, Michael Ambrose, Nicole Caso, Matthew Dillon, Scott H. Sicherer, Eyal Shemesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the degree to which children and adolescents with food allergy accept responsibility for their own care, and the extent to which greater self-management is associated with past history of a life-threatening allergic reaction or anxiety. For children (n = 190), caregiver and patient report of self-management was consistent, but agreement was poor for adolescent dyads (n = 59). History of a life-threatening allergic reaction was associated with greater self-management for children only, while among adolescents, it was associated with greater anxiety. Given that shifting to self-management may be challenging, discussion and preparation about this process is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)693-701
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 Jun 2015

Keywords

  • allocation of responsibility
  • anxiety
  • food allergy
  • self-management
  • transition

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