Additive interaction of child abuse and perinatal risk as signs of resiliency in adulthood

Yoko Nomura, Claude M. Chemtob, William P. Fifer, Jeffrey H. Newcorn, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

To find the biological basis of resilience, we exploited data from a longitudinal community-based study of 1,748 adult children, followed from birth to adulthood. Results showed that those with both abuse and perinatal problems demonstrated synergistically impaired well-being, a higher rate of school dropout, lower sense of success, and lower income. Among abused adult children (n = 271), we found that those without, relative to those with, perinatal problems had lower risk for adult psychopathology. An examination of the biological base of resilience could be added in a multidimensional/ multifactorial model to help researchers identify ways to promote resiliency even before birth.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationResilience in Children
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Inc.
Pages330-334
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)1573316431, 9781573316439
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1094
ISSN (Print)0077-8923
ISSN (Electronic)1749-6632

Keywords

  • Childhood abuse
  • Low birthweight
  • Preterm birth
  • Psychopathology
  • Resiliency

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Additive interaction of child abuse and perinatal risk as signs of resiliency in adulthood'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this