Active Choice and Financial Incentives to Increase Rates of Screening Colonoscopy–A Randomized Controlled Trial

Shivan J. Mehta, Jordyn Feingold, Matthew Vandertuyn, Tess Niewood, Catherine Cox, Chyke A. Doubeni, Kevin G. Volpp, David A. Asch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Behavioral economic approaches could increase uptake for colorectal cancer screening. We performed a randomized controlled trial of 2245 employees to determine whether an email containing a phone number for scheduling (control), an email with the active choice to opt in or opt out (active choice), or the active choice email plus a $100 incentive (financial incentive) increased colonoscopy completion within 3 months. Higher proportions of participants in the financial incentive group underwent screening (3.7%) than in the control (1.6%) or active choice groups (1.5%) (P =.01 and P <.01). We found no difference in uptake of screening between the active choice and control groups (P =.88). The $100 conditional incentive modestly but significantly increased colonoscopy use. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT02660671.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1227-1229.e2
JournalGastroenterology
Volume153
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Behavioral Economics
  • CRC
  • Clinical
  • Early Detection

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