A unique drug treatment program for pregnant and postpartum substance- using women in New York City: Results of a pilot project, 1990-1995

Claire McMurtrie, Kenneth D. Rosenberg, Bonnie D. Kerker, Jianli Kan, Elizabeth H. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the 1980s, there was virtually no drug treatment for pregnant women in New York City, especially women who used crack cocaine. The purpose of the Parent and Child Enrichment (PACE) demonstration project was to assess the effectiveness of the one-stop shopping model of drug treatment for this population. Among PACE clients, 88% were primarily users of crack cocaine. The mean total length of stay was 100.0 days (median 55.5 days). Client retention 42 days after intake was 54.3%. This paper describes the essential components of this program model. 'Long-stay' and 'short-stay' clients were compared using urine toxicology tests and activity logs. In addition, the birth outcomes of clients were compared to two similar populations. A strong positive correlation was found between total length of stay and low rate of positive urine drug tests (UDTs). Infants of PACE long-stay clients had greater mean birth weight, less low birth weight, and less intrauterine growth retardation than the infants of the comparison groups. Fetal exposure to cocaine was decreased dramatically among women who were enrolled for 42 or more days during their pregnancy. This model of drug treatment for pregnant and postpartum women seems to improve mothers' lives, fetal drug exposure, and birth outcome significantly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)701-713
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cocaine
  • Pregnancy
  • Street drugs
  • Substance abuse/rehabilitation
  • Substance use disorders/therapy

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