A transmissible γδ intraepithelial lymphocyte hyperproliferative phenotype is associated with the intestinal microbiota and confers protection against acute infection

Luo Jia, Guojun Wu, Sara Alonso, Cuiping Zhao, Alexander Lemenze, Yan Y. Lam, Liping Zhao, Karen L. Edelblum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intraepithelial lymphocytes expressing the γδ T cell receptor (γδ IELs) serve as a first line of defense against luminal microbes. Although the presence of an intact microbiota is dispensable for γδ IEL development, several microbial factors contribute to the maintenance of this sentinel population. However, whether specific commensals influence population of the γδ IEL compartment under homeostatic conditions has yet to be determined. We identified a novel γδ IEL hyperproliferative phenotype that arises early in life and is characterized by expansion of multiple Vγ subsets. Horizontal transfer of this hyperproliferative phenotype to mice harboring a phenotypically normal γδ IEL compartment was prevented following antibiotic treatment, thus demonstrating that the microbiota is both necessary and sufficient for the observed increase in γδ IELs. Further, we identified two guilds of small intestinal or fecal bacteria represented by 12 amplicon sequence variants (ASV) that are strongly associated with γδ IEL expansion. Using intravital microscopy, we find that hyperproliferative γδ IELs also exhibit increased migratory behavior leading to enhanced protection against bacterial infection. These findings reveal that transfer of a specific group of commensals can regulate γδ IEL homeostasis and immune surveillance, which may provide a novel means to reinforce the epithelial barrier.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)772-782
Number of pages11
JournalMucosal Immunology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022
Externally publishedYes

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