A quantitative model for the kinetics of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (type II) activity. Long-term activation of the kinase and its possible relevance to learning and memory

J. D. Buxbaum, Y. Dudai

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Abstract

Using computer simulation we have modeled the kinetics of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, type II, following transient pulses of cAMP. We show that under the appropriate physiological conditions, the kinase can remain activated 20 min or longer after the cessation of adenylate cyclase activation, in a process we term long-term activation. Long-term activation depends in part on the state of phosphorylation of the regulatory subunit, because phosphorylation of the regulatory subunit regulates the affinity of this subunit for the catalytic subunit. We have used our model to simulate experiments that have been performed on the kinetic and steady state activities of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and have found good agreement between the simulations and the experimental data. The effects of the activity of phosphodiesterase, adenylate cyclase, and protein phosphatase on the kinetics of cAMP-dependent protein kinase have been modeled, as have the effects of different ratios of regulatory subunit to catalytic subunit. We have also simulated the activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase in Drosophila learning and memory mutants having primary or secondary defects in the cAMP-cascade. We make predictions regarding the behavior of different mutants, which are in line with experimental data. The model corroborates the assumption that the cAMP cascade may play a role in learning and short-term memory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9344-9351
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume264
Issue number16
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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