A new modular radiographic classification of adult idiopathic scoliosis as an extension of the Lenke classification of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

James D. Lin, Joseph A. Osorio, Griffin R. Baum, Richard P. Menger, Patrick C. Reid, Marc D. Dyrszka, Louis F. Amorosa, Zeeshan M. Sardar, Christopher E. Mandigo, Peter D. Angevine, Michael P. Kelly, Meghan Cerpa, Lawrence G. Lenke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To propose and test the reliability of a radiographic classification system for adult idiopathic scoliosis. Methods: A three-component radiographic classification for adult idiopathic scoliosis consisting of curve type, a lumbosacral modifier, and a global alignment modifier is presented. Twelve spine surgeons graded 30 pre-marked cases twice, approximately 1 week apart. Case order was randomized between sessions. Results: The interrater reliability (Fleiss’ kappa coefficient) for curve type was 0.660 and 0.798, for the lumbosacral modifier 0.944 and 0.965, and for the global alignment modifier 0.922 and 0.916, for round 1 and 2 respectively. Mean intrarater reliability was 0.807. Conclusions: This new radiographic classification of adult idiopathic scoliosis maintains the curve types from the Lenke classification and introduces the lumbosacral and global alignment modifiers. The reliability of the lumbosacral modifier and global alignment modifier shows near perfect agreement, and sets the foundation for further studies to validate the reliability, utility, and applicability of this classification system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-183
Number of pages9
JournalSpine Deformity
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Arthrodesis
  • Classification
  • Idiopathic
  • Lumbosacral
  • Scoliosis

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