A new hemostasis valve for neuroendovascular procedures

K. Namba, J. K. Song, Y. Niimi, N. S. Heran, A. Berenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

A hemostasis valve is routinely used in neuroendovascular procedures to decrease the risk of thromboembolism1,2. Recently, a new hemostasis valve that is designed to minimize blood loss has been introduced. We report our initial experience in using this new hemostasis valve. In neuroendovascular procedures, a hemostasis valve is commonly used for continuous irrigation of guide and microcatheters to decrease the risk of thromboembolism1,2,3. A conventional hemostasis valve has a rotating seal at the end, which is turned open or closed each time a wire or microcatheter/guidewire is introduced or extracted. Often this results in significant back bleeding. When a rotating seal is adjusted suboptimally during a wire or microcatheter manipulation, leakage of pressurized saline from the end of a hemostasis valve results in stagnation of blood within a guiding catheter, which becomes a potential source of emboli during a procedure. The Guardian Haemostasis Valve (Zerusa Limited, Galway, Ireland) is a new hemostasis valve that is designed to minimize blood loss during interventional procedures by minimizing the opening time of the valve during wire or microcatheter insertion. A continuous sealing mechanism during wire or microcatheter positioning minimizes blood loss and stagnation of blood within the guide catheter. We report our initial experience with the Guardian hemostasis valve.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-53
Number of pages3
JournalInterventional Neuroradiology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Angiographic device
  • Angiography
  • Hemostatic valve

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