A Cross-Sectional Study of the Prevalence of Anal Dysplasia among Women with High-Grade Cervical, Vaginal, and Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer: The PANDA Study

Samantha Batman, Craig A. Messick, Andrea Milbourne, Ming Guo, Mark F. Munsell, Joel Fokom-Domgue, Mila Salcedo, Ashish Deshmukh, Kristina R. Dahlstrom, Mallory Ogburn, Anthony Price, Nicole D. Fleming, Jolyn Taylor, Aaron Shafer, Lauren Cobb, Keith Sigel, Erich M. Sturgis, Elizabeth Y. Chiao, Kathleen M. Schmeler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection is a risk factor for anal cancer, yet no anal cancer screening guidelines exist for women with lower genital tract HPV-related disease. We sought to describe the prevalence of anal HR-HPV or cytologic abnormalities in such women. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed between October 2018 and December 2021. Inclusion criteria were ≥21 years of age and a prior diagnosis of high-grade dysplasia/cancer of the cervix, vagina, or vulva. Participants underwent anal cytology and anal/cervicovaginal HR-HPV testing. Women with abnormal anal cytology were referred for high-resolution anoscopy (HRA). Results: 324 evaluable women were enrolled. Primary diagnosis was high-grade dysplasia/cancer of the cervix (77%), vagina (9%), and vulva (14%). Anal HR-HPV was detected in 92 patients (28%) and included HPV-16 in 24 (26%), HPV-18 in 6 (7%), and other HR-HPV types in 72 (78%) patients. Anal cytology was abnormal in 70 patients (23%) and included atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (80%), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (9%), high-grade intraepithelial lesion (HSIL; 1%), and atypical squamous cells-cannot rule out HSIL (10%). Of these patients, 55 (79%) underwent HRA. Anal biopsies were performed in 14 patients: 2 patients had anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) 2/3, 1 patient had AIN 1, and 11 patients had negative biopsies. Both patients with AIN 2/3 had a history of cervical dysplasia. Conclusions: Our results suggest an elevated risk of anal HR-HPV infection and cytologic abnormalities in women with lower genital tract dysplasia/cancer. Impact: These results add to the growing body of evidence suggesting the need for evaluation of screening methods for anal dysplasia/cancer in this patient population to inform evidence-based screening recommendations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2185-2191
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume31
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2022

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