A Chaperone-Assisted Degradation Pathway Targets Kinetochore Proteins to Ensure Genome Stability

Franziska Kriegenburg, Visnja Jakopec, Esben G. Poulsen, Sofie Vincents Nielsen, Assen Roguev, Nevan Krogan, Colin Gordon, Ursula Fleig, Rasmus Hartmann-Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cells are regularly exposed to stress conditions that may lead to protein misfolding. To cope with this challenge, molecular chaperones selectively target structurally perturbed proteins for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In mammals the co-chaperone BAG-1 plays an important role in this system. BAG-1 has two orthologues, Bag101 and Bag102, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that both Bag101 and Bag102 interact with 26S proteasomes and Hsp70. By epistasis mapping we identify a mutant in the conserved kinetochore component Spc7 (Spc105/Blinkin) as a target for a quality control system that also involves, Hsp70, Bag102, the 26S proteasome, Ubc4 and the ubiquitin-ligases Ubr11 and San1. Accordingly, chromosome missegregation of spc7 mutant strains is alleviated by mutation of components in this pathway. In addition, we isolated a dominant negative version of the deubiquitylating enzyme, Ubp3, as a suppressor of the spc7-23 phenotype, suggesting that the proteasome-associated Ubp3 is required for this degradation system. Finally, our data suggest that the identified pathway is also involved in quality control of other kinetochore components and therefore likely to be a common degradation mechanism to ensure nuclear protein homeostasis and genome integrity.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1004140
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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